Faith of a Five Year Old

My mom was going through boxes of old family stuff in the garage when she came across this fine work of art. I drew this when I was about five years old and on the back I wrote:

I had a dream theat I was in the Olympics and I wun ave sgl game and my mom and dad was happy at me and I wis it hapind.

Back then I was certain that I would become an Olympic Gold medalist. I didn’t know how to spell “happened” but I definitely knew how to spell “Olympics.”

After laughing at my awful handwriting and portrayal of my parents, I began to think. Would Tara, age 5, be disappointed in Tara, age 21?  True, kids change their dreams quicker than we change the channels on a boring Saturday night, but I still couldn’t shake the thought. I was only in kindergarten but yet I had bigger dreams than I do as a senior in college.

Remember when dreaming was that simple? There were no such things as limits or doubts of our capabilities.

If we all had the faith of a five year old, the number of things that we could accomplish would be infinite. We wouldn’t worry about how much work, time, or money our dreams would take. Instead we’d take the first step and leave the rest to fate.

Somehow if I could meet my five year old self with the help of a time machine, I’d say thank you. Thank you for reminding me that sometimes dreams are as simple as dreaming them, and knowing they will happen.

Faith is to believe what you do not see; the reward of this faith is to see what you believe.

-Saint Augustine

 

—Tara Pook

76 comments

  1. When I was five, I couldn’t decide if I wanted to be a ballet dancer or an opera singer!
    Needless to say, I cannot dance to save my life and I am not a famous opera singer like I had planned. I have sang in competition and been very good, but alas!

    I think that five-year-old me would be absolutely confused with what 21-year-old me now wants; to be a forensic analyst. But then again, five-year-old me did love to watch Law and Order with family…

    Lovely post! Wishing I could find my own old drawings now!

  2. I think in a way, we still can have the faith of a five-year-old. I don’t think I have a particularly good memory, but I remember what it felt like to be five, and I was strangely aware of my innocence, if that makes sense. I knew I was out of the loop on something that I totally didn’t understand and couldn’t really if I tried.

    I still feel like that now, but I know what the name of it is. It’s the future. I have no idea where I’m going to go. All the things that have happened to me in my life, I never would have predicted. Some of them I waited for for a long, long, time, but when they actually happened, it was nothing like I expected. Releasing that expectation is difficult, but it can be replaced by trust in God that he will take care of me. I have no choice; stories like mine are the kind that happen in movies, I think, and I’m so grateful that God shaped my life the way he did, and that is why I would stay I still have a childlike faith. It might be because I’ve only been a Christian for a year, but it also might be because I really know that God exists, simply by the way he has revealed himself to me in my own life.

  3. The craziness of childhood doesn’t ever get back when we get old. very nice art of yours. telling me of how much creative you must have been in your childhood. but its very clear that since childhood you are faithful towards your goal.

  4. Amanda Williams
    This story really made me smile. I remember being young and wanting to do everything on earth. I wanted to draw comic books, be a poet, a rapper, WNBA player.etc. I really wanted to do it all. I didn’t care what the world or anybody else thought of my dreams and ambitions. Being young is so fun. You don’t have a care in the world, but still have no clue about the real world. When young, you think you know EVERYTHING but you really just have to find out the hard way. Many people lose sight of themselves and what they want to do in life all the time. If people stuck to their dreams and ambitions and had that “I DON’T CARE” attitude, there would be many more people doing what they set out to do. Instead, today we base what we want to do off of what everybody else is doing.Sad but true. When your young you have the right to be unsure, and cofused about what you want to do in life, that’s when you have an excuse. But when you get older, you start to care about what Tom, Dick,and Harry thinks. I’ve always been the type of person that cared what people thought to an extent. I never let others thought interfere with what I felt, thought, dreamed, or loved. At some point you question yourself for a quick second, but then something triggers you to block that out even when others want you to care. This story is very inspiring, and relevant to my life. This story reminds me to to what I want to do in life, even if you feel its impossible. One should never give up, or second guess what they know their capable of. “Follow your dreams, face your fears, and always smile. Life is so precious and you’ll never regret doing what you love. Believe in yourself.”
    -Unknown

  5. As a mom with two kids…thank you for this reminder. As their mom…it is my job to help them dream and if I can’t dream and have the faith…how can I help them. Thank you for posting this and reminding us all, to dream and have faith.

  6. So very true! It seems the older we get, the harder it is to dream new or old dreams. I think we all need to meet our 5 year old selves and spend some time getting re-acquainted! I think many of us would be much happier and regain the confidence to go after the things that we truly love, no matter what anyone thinks.

  7. Love this article and the pic you did as a little girl! Keep this pic to show your children in the future. I am constantly amazed by the wisdom of children and their outlook on life. i too need this reminder! xo

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